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360 Degree Feedback: What Everyone Thinks of You

360 Degree Feedback

360 Degree FeedbackOrganisational life revolves around performance monitoring and measuring. Often it’s a single person who will assess your performance. But what if they had access to the observations of all sorts of people who work with you in different ways? That’s the big idea that 360 Degree Feedback represents.

The idea and practice of 360 degree feedback has been through rises and falls since it first appeared in the 1950s. And it really took off in the 1990s. But it is as important today as it’s ever been. So, let’s examine 360 degree feedback from a number of angles.

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Delegation: Double your Capacity

The Management Pocketbooks Pocket Correspondence Course

This is part of an extended management course. You can dip into it, or follow the course from the start. If you do that, you may want a course notebook, for the exercises and any notes you want to make.


Management is not about doing things: it is about getting things done. So a large part of your responsibility is allocating work among your team and developing people to take on more demanding challenges. Delegation – getting other people to do aspects of your work – is a part both of effective working and of developing people.

Whilst there are lots of poor reasons for delegating – like off-loading unpleasant tasks, or abdicating responsibility – there are many positive benefits to you, to your team, and to your organisation.

Exercise 1: The Reasons to Delegate?

Make a list of all of the good reasons to delegate. To help you, consider the question from three perspectives:

  1. How can you benefit?
  2. How can your team members benefit?
  3. How can your organisation benefit?

Failure to delegate

The problem is that many managers constantly find excuses for not delegating; even when they know they ought to for many of the reasons you have probably identified. What are yours?

Exercise 2: Excuses for Not Delegating

Here are some excuses I commonly encounter. For each of these, how would you counter the excuse?

  • “I’d be better off doing it myself”
  • “I don’t want to overload my staff”
  • “I don’t have the time to delegate”
  • “I know exactly how I want it done”
  • “If I ask him/her to do it, he/she will be nagging me every five minutes”

How to Delegate

Some people use these excuses simply because they don’t feel comfortable with the process of delegation. Indeed, many guides either make it seem like a big deal, or they miss out an important aspect of the process, leaving people wondering why it fails. So let’s look at the basic delegation process.

Delegation

Step 1. Matching

Understand the task, its level of importance and urgency, and the risks associated with it. Then consider the people available to you, and their abilities, strengths, preferences, and their existing commitments. Also think about their development routes. Now match the task to the most suitable person.

Step 2. Briefing

Brief effectively. Taking time to do this properly is an investment that will result in fewer interruptions, a greater chance of innovation and excellence, and a reduced chance of mistakes and failures.

Step 3. Commitment

After you have briefed and answered any questions, ask if they:

  • Understand the task required
  • Can carry out the task required – do they have the ability and availability?
  • Believe the resources and time allocated are sufficient for the task required

Then ask for their commitment to do the task required. In return, offer your commitment to support and monitor the process.

Step 4. Monitoring

An important part of risk management and of developing the person you have delegated to is to monitor their performance. Monitor more or less frequently, depending on your level of confidence and certainty, and the level of risk.  Remember: when you delegate a task, you retain responsibility for it.

Step 5. Feedback

When the job is done, offer objective feedback on performance, recognise the work done and contribution made, reward it with thanks and praise, and highlight what the person can learn from their experience.

Further Reading 

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Come and see us next week

Management Pocketbooks are at the CIPD’s HRD Exhibition on 21 & 22 April, at Olympia.

HRD Excel 09 001571

We’d love to see you – come and visit us on stand 571.

There will be a blog soon on memory, but in the meantime, to help you remember the stand number, you can always picture Delia Smith or Sophie Dahl or Jamie Oliver or Heston Blumenthal (pick your favourite) ‘strive to make a
heavenly
bun
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Buy five get one free

We’ll be selling all pocketbooks at a £1 discount (at £6.99 each) and for every five books you buy, you can pick another one free.  What better time to top up your collection?

What’s New?

If you are wondering how to use this offer, why not top up with new titles that weren’t born before the last HRD:

You might also like to update to a new edition.  In the last year, Pocketbooks authors have been hard at work updating and revising:

e-Pocketbooks

PBK-e-Library DVD (RED)Carry your Pocketbooks around on your phone or iPod Touch, have them on your laptop, or have a full set on disc.  We’ll be happy to talk with you about subscriptions to our whole portfolio of e-books – our e-Library – or buying single Pocketbooks in electronic format.  e-Pocketbooks.

If you cannot wait until 21 April, see our website for more information.

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Pocketbooks Live
‘I want to give you some feedback…..’

Mike Pezet, author of the new Feedback Pocketbook, will be presenting in the Learning Arena on Thursday 22 April from 15.00 to 15:45.  His presentation is: ‘I want to give you some feedback…..’.

Mike’s presentation will demonstrate simple ways to establish effective feedback relationships and encourage acceptance; highlight some basic mistakes; describe how to avoid feedback adding to the blame culture; and show how to avoid negative feedback situations.  All in 45 minutes.

Feedback

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